Weapons & Armor

As the art of LARP has progressed, the techniques used to construct safe and effective weapons have grown more sophisticated and more varied. As such, we no longer publish instructions on how to construct weapons. Instead we post guidelines detailing the requirements needed to pass our weapon check. While we do not intend to discourage our players from learning how to construct their own weapons, we encourage new players to obtain weapons from or to seek the advice of experienced weapon makers rather than trying to construct weapons from a set of written instructions we might provide.

Included you will find:

Legal Weapons Types

Inspection Procedures

Weapon Colors

Weapon Length Requirements

Specific Weapon Guidelines

Archery Specifics

Shield Regulations

Spell Packet Construction Instructions

Advanced Weapon Construction Info

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Legal Weapons Types

Players are encouraged to construct their own weapons, but the size limitations outlined below will apply. For those that do not feel comfortable creating their own boffer weapons, rentals will be made available at each event for a small nominal fee. Additionally, there are many different websites that sell constructed boffer weapons. A list of vendors and websites can be obtained by contacting the game via the website or e-mail.

At Lione Rampant, we encourage the use of Sock, Duct tape style and Plastic Dip weapons.

Sock Construction: These weapons are constructed with kite pole cores, custom fitting foam, and have a crafted hilt or haft with a sock fitting over the blade or striking surface.

Duct Tape Construction: These weapons are constructed in the more traditional way with graphite core, pvc handles, open cell foam thrusting tips and pipe foam blade and pommel. The duct tape overlay creates a sealed layer. We ask members to continue upkeep and repair on these weapons.

Plasti-dip Constructed Weapons – Are allowed only if they adhere to our guidelines for weapon foam thickness and have soft rounded thrusting tips. These weapons are time consuming as they require sanded foam, DAP glued blades and thrusting tips, and multiple layers of thinned plasti-dip before they are painted. Experienced weapon makers can make beautiful weapons using these techniques.

We sometimes allow latex weapons, so if you wish to introduce one of these weapons as a playtest you should contact us via email before the event. These weapons vary in quality, and can often be unsafe in regards to having the foam thickness or tip construction to pass safety inspections. They may be approved for use on a case-by-case basis pending onsite inspection. Because these weapons depend on the lightest touch to remain safe, we do reserve the right at ANY point during an event to revoke a latex phys-rep, even if it initially passed inspection, and no longer allow the use of said weapon.

Inspection

Regardless of construction technique, all weapons and shields must pass inspection by a Lione Rampant: The Second Crusade director at every event during the check in process. All weapons deemed safe for use will receive an inspection band, which must remain affixed to the weapon during the event. The director will not only inspect every weapon for construction method but will also examine the weapon for degradation and length requirements. If deemed unsafe, a weapon will be prohibited from game play until the defect is remedied. If you do come to a Lione Rampant: The Second Crusade event with a weapon of unapproved design, the possibility of your weapon being rejected is high.

Will my weapon pass inspection?

Here are the qualities we require before we approve a weapon for general use in the game.

~ The thickness of the foam on the striking surface of the weapon should be at least 5/8” around the core. We do allow for a flatter blade construction, but players using these types of weapons should not strike with the flat of the blade.

~ The thrusting tip should be soft foam and be flat or rounded. It should not be hard foam, and it should not be crafted so it comes to a point that is less than 90 degrees. Ideally it should be rounded with no point at all.
~ A weapon should pass the “push the tip against my eye” test. If the weapon, when gently pressed against the eye, has a thrusting tip that is painful or potentially damaging then the weapon won’t pass. This is what causes most latex weapons to fail inspection.

~ A weapon should have a soft enough striking edge that it cannot harm a player if it strikes them in the throat with force that might be generated by a running player.
~ The weapon cannot be too “whippy” – if we hold the end and shake it the weapon should not noticeably bend.
~ All weapons must adhere to the guidelines below to color, size, length, and striking surface proportion.

Weapon Colors

Weapons are color coded for easy identification. Personal weapons may be decorated but the weapon type dictates what the dominant color must be. For instance, a blade blackened sword can be black with red grooves, runes, or trim, but the majority of the weapon’s area must be colored black. When constructing weapons, it is important to use the following color conventions:

  • Gray or black may be used for any part of a weapon made from metal (common duct tape color).
  • Brown is used for any part of a weapon constructed from wood.
  • Red is used for claws or other natural weapons.
  • Blue is used for fists for unarmed combat skills.
  • White is used for all magical weapons (and is restricted for use on any other weapon type).

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Armor

Please see the accelerant rules for armor descriptors.

Specific Weapon Guidelines

Blades:
These weapons represent daggers and all types of swords. A bladed weapon has a striking surface that covers at least 2/3 of its entire length. The weapon may have a cross guard or hand guard, but the guard must be made entirely of pipe foam or the equivalent.

One Handed Hafted: Axes, Maces, Hammers and smashing weapons.

An axe needs padding that covers at least 1/2 of its entire length. The striking surface is a head of open celled foam at least 8″ in length that extends at least 4″ from the shaft, and looks like an axe blade.
A hammer needs padding that covers at least 1/2 of its entire length. The striking surface is a head of open celled foam at least 6″ long that extends at least 4″ from the shaft, although this could be 2″ on both sides for a mace.
As Lione Rampant: The Second Crusade’s genre is post apocalyptic we ask that more modern weapons try to adhere to the same proportions for safety.

Staves
Staves are required to be padded across the entirely of the weapon, no matter the size. It also requires the proper core size to prevent ‘whippiness’ and have a thrusting tip on both ends.

Two-Handed Clubs

These weapons represent weapons made entirely from wood. A club needs padding that covers just under half 1/2 of its maximum length. Decorative additions must be open cell foam that extends at least 1″ from the shaft, or it could be an additional layer of pipe foam.

Polearms
Covering all types of longer pole weapons, polearms have the advantage of reach. A polearm must have padding that covers down the striking end at least 1/2 of its entire length. The striking surface must cover at least 12″, and must include additional padding of open cell foam that extends at least 1″ from the shaft or another layer of pipe foam cut in half.

Claws
These weapons represent some kind of natural weaponry. Unlike other weapons, you cannot carry claws unless you have a magical or racial ability to grow them, and you cannot hand them off to other characters. Characters who can use claws are assumed to be able to grow claws (ie. you have the props in hand and ready to fight) and retract them (ie. you have put them away or do not have them in hand) as well.

A claw needs padding that covers at least 2/3 of its entire length. The striking surface is the padded area of the weapon above the grip.

Claws are not affected by Disarm effects. If a claw is affected by a Destroy effect, the character will take a Maim effect to the limb holding the claw.

Thrown Weapons

All thrown weapons must consist 100% of thrusting foam or open cell. No hard objects may be added. Thrown weapons are not to be used for melee. And must adhere to the “eye” safety check.

Small thrown weapons that represent axes, hammers, daggers, and rocks must be made entirely of foam and covered with a single layer of tape. These weapons can be no longer than 12″ in length and must have one dimension of at least 4″.

Rocks should be round and between 4″ and 6″ in diameter. Small thrown weapons need not have item tags.

Large thrown weapons are used to represent javelins and short throwing spears. As with small thrown weapons, they may only be thrown and no rigid materials may be used in their construction. These larger weapons should be made of the foam tubing used in hand-to-hand weapon construction, covered with tape and must have a standard thrusting tip. It is allowed to place a small weight inside the foam behind the thrusting tip to make the weapon easier to throw, but the item can be no heavier than a standard C cell battery. These weapons must be at least 30″ in length, but cannot exceed 48″. Soft, collapsible fins may be attached if desired. Large thrown weapons must be inspected at every event at check-in.

Archery

This skill allows the player to load and fire any crossbow or bow weapon for a base of 1 damage.  Without this skill, the player does not have the minimum required knowledge needed to load the weapon, and are additionally not trained with the proper aiming and firing techniques of the weapon.

Archery – Weapon Phys-reps:

Any bow or crossbow phys-rep that fire NERF style arrows, NERF style darts (non-suction cup tips) or spell packets may typically be used.  Other weapons may be allowed on a case by case basis, as determined during weapon inspection, but may be rejected for any reason. Questions in regards to photos, may be directed to L7@LIONERAMPANT.COM. We may not be able to guarantee a weapon will pass inspection without personally inspecting it, but we may be able to give a general idea if a specific item is considered generally acceptable.

Single shot Nerf guns may be used, however, they must be decorated to appear as though they are actually crossbows with a cross piece on the end. Additionally, any phys-rep must be painted to appear to be made entirely of wood and/or metal.  Any bright colors must be covered using paint. White paint may not be used, as it is only allowed to be used on magic weapons.

If a NERF gun be being used that is designed to hold more than one arrow, then there must be a clear 3 second pause between firing multiple shots. If a player does not adhere to this rule, the player will be informed by a LIONE director or staff member, the weapon inspection tag will be removed from the weapon, and that phys-rep may not be used again that event.

All crossbow and bow phys-reps, as well as all ammunition, must be inspected at check-in of every event, and must receive a weapon inspection tag prior to being used in-game.  No modifications to the internal mechanisms of the phys-rep (example, to increase firing power or distance) will be allowed, and will automatically cause the phys-rep to fail inspection and be rejected from the game.

We approve the use of ‘packet bows’; bows that use packet projectiles that are made from padded PVC and bungee. The arrows are represented with packets. You must load the arrow, pull to your ear and release.

See our rulebook for examples of Archery and ammo phys-reps.

Shield Construction

Shields come in many designs: Round, heater, oval, rectangle, and triangle to name just a few.

There are many types of shield shapes for the sake of individualization.

A regular shield, may not exceed a length of 36 inches, at its angled length. All size limitations include the foam edging required on all design types.

The following table gives maximum dimensions for common shield shapes.  Any unusually shaped shield will be judged individually and may be rejected even if it is within these size limitations.

Variances will be allowed on a case by case basis. As with weapons, your alternative construction ideas should be discussed with a game official prior to the actual construction of the shield.

For further instructions on how to create a shield please contact L7@lionerampant.com.

Spell Packet Construction

According to official Accelerant guidelines: “The head of the packet should be between 1 and 1.5 inches in diameter, and the tail behind the tape should not be longer than 3 inches.”

Spell packets must be made to very specific standards for both safety and durability. Spell packets will be inspected at check-in of every event and additionally may be inspected at any time during the game by a director or staff member. To assure that a player’s packets will pass inspection, we suggest the following technique for their construction.

  1. Take an 8″ square of soft, durable, light-colored cloth (cloth of dark colors are prohibited).
  2. Fill a standard shot-glass with small birdseed (no sunflower seeds may be in the mix due to the sharp points of their shell). Note: There are no other legal spell packet fillings.
  3. Pour the full shot-glass of bird seed into the center of the 8″ square of cloth.
  4. Pull the edges up and back to make a pouch in the center enclosing the birdseed.
  5. Use rubber bands, string, tape, or needle and thread to close the packet. The “tail” of the packet may be trimmed to meet guidelines from there. Never wrap the tails of the spell packets with duct tape or apply other rigid substances such as glue or paste. Overall the packet head should be firm enough to maintain shape but not made so tight as to become compact.
  6. Putting your initials on each packet makes them easier to identify and recover after combat.

Spell packets are in-game, meaning they can be stolen or taken from an incapacitated character.  Without the necessary components, a spell caster is unable to cast spells. Even though each spell caster makes personal packets, it is allowable for a character to use another character’s packets.

Advanced Construction Notes

If you do intend to learn how to construct your own weapons, here are the materials that are common in the construction of our LARP weapons.

.414 Ultralight

The core this refers to is actually called spiral wound fiberglass tubing and can be purchased from a number of online vendors. Intended to be used as a kite pole, the core is light, durable, and has give. This is only appropriate for one handed weapons with no head.

.505 Ultralight

The core this refers to is actually called spiral wound fiberglass tubing and can be purchased from a number of online vendors. Intended to be used as a kite pole, the core is light, durable, and has give. One handed weapons use the .505 diameter pole.

.610 Ultralight

This core is a thicker version of the spiral wound fiberglass tubing used for two handed weapons.

Ultralight two handed weapons require extra padding on the striking surface. The weapon should have at least 1” of foam padding on the striking surface of the weapon.

3/4” PVC

Although not ideal, this common core can be used in a pinch for one handed weapons. It is too generally too heavy and whippy for anything longer than a short sword. You will want to find schedule 20 PVC pipe with a thin wall. There are schedule 40 pipes with thicker walls that are too heavy to make good weapons. This core can also be bent into bows by applying very hot water, or softening it if you are good with the heat of a stove or gas burner. CPVC usually has more whip than PVC.

1/2” PVC

This core is too whippy to use for longer weapons, but can be used for small weapons or even short swords. This material is not good for any other type of weapon.

Aluminum
This material has no give, so it cannot be used for one handed weapons. The purpose of aluminum is to give two handed weapons with older construction less whip. It have fallen out of use in favor of .610 spiral wound tubing.

Some older two handed weapons use a 7/8″ galvanized aluminum and 3/4″ CPVC core. The cores should be picked so the CPVC fits snugly into the aluminum. They should overlap about three inches and be secured together with an adhesive like Plumber’s Goop or with a good amount of strapping tape wrapped around the seam.

Open Cell Foam

Weapon tips are generally constructed from open cell foam. You can purchase this foam at most fabric stores. Tips are generally affixed to the end of the weapon with glue and reinforced with a small amount of tape before the weapon sock is put over the blade.
Small thrown weapons represent axes, hammers, daggers, and rocks. They must be made entirely of foam and covered with a single layer of tape. These weapons can be no longer than 12″ in length and must have one dimension of at least 4″.

Rocks should be round and between 4″ and 6″ in diameter. Small thrown weapons need not have item tags.

Large thrown weapons are used to represent javelins and short throwing spears. As with small thrown weapons, they may only be thrown and no rigid materials may be used in their construction. These larger weapons should be made of the foam tubing used in hand-to-hand weapon construction, covered with tape and must have a standard thrusting tip. It is allowed to place a small weight inside the foam behind the thrusting tip to make the weapon easier to throw, but the item can be no heavier than a standard C cell battery. These weapons must be at least 30″ in length, but cannot exceed 48″. Soft, collapsible fins may be attached if desired. Large thrown weapons must be inspected at every event at check-in.